Art-o-mat®

Art Vending Machines

About a year ago, I stumbled upon the neatest thing in art that I’ve seen in years. Art-o-mat® takes retired cigarette vending machines and turns them into art vending machines. The Art-o-mat® machines hold art from many artists and I believe there are 400 artists from 10 different countries represented, as of July 7th, 2020. I purchased a prototype kit last year and after it was approved, I ordered my blocks and began working on the paintings at the end of last year. You can see my block floral series below.

I had an appendectomy for a ruptured appendix at the end of last year and a subsequent infection, which landed me in the hospital again a month later. All of this slowed me down quite a bit. But, FINALLY, I got all 50 of them finished and mailed from FedEx on Monday, and they are scheduled to arrive in North Carolina tomorrow, on the 8th of July, 2020.

These blocks were so much fun to create. At first it was a bit awkward because I usually don’t work so small. But once I got used to painting on that size block, things went faster. I also started working smarter as I neared the end of the batch as I began an assembly line method of painting. However, I did make each one unique; no two are alike. I wanted all of my pieces to look like they belong together and were made by the same artist, yet I strove for uniqueness as well. I am very pleased with how all of them turned out and I really hope some of the collectors who purchase them get in touch with me, simply to let me know they have one of my pieces.

I think this method of selling artwork is ideal for new and emerging artists, but also good for established artists. It’s a great way to get the word out about your art in other states, or even internationally, as there are several machines in other countries, too.

I can’t wait to see where they place my Art-o-mat® blocks!

Visit artomat.org for additional information.

abstract art, collection

New Collection Available: Overload

NEW COLLECTION! I am pleased to share the paintings in my new collection titled, Overload, that I began during the quarantine and just finished last week! Each of these is 24″x24″ (2 feet x 2 feet) and has gallery wrapped edges (composition extended to the sides).

This series was a blast to create as I explored a rainbow inspired shape in all of them, which was the only intentional aspect of the series. Other than incorporating the shape across all the pieces, I painted intuitively without a predetermined plan and painted from my emotions.

They are sold unframed, but since the sides are painted and they are wired on the back, they are ready to hang.

Each piece’s title was chosen based on life during a pandemic, how I was feeling at the time of the painting, or on my activities during the quarantine.

I plan to start my next series in about a month or so, but while I’m waiting to begin, I will be planning it out — deciding on the characteristic(s) that will tie the pieces together — whether it’s color, shape, texture, composition, or another unifying aspect. At this point I am leaning toward texture because I’d like to work on incorporating more texture into my pieces.

I hope you like seeing my work in collections rather than individually as I am moving away from creating individual standalone pieces, and moving towards working in series most all of the time. Even though each piece will be a part of a collection, they will still be sold individually, if desired. DM if you are interested in a piece or you can purchase on my website at loririveraart.com. It will definitely be difficult parting with these as I love how they all look together.

From left to right, top to bottom:

  1. Mortality
  2. Jitterbug
  3. After Midnight
  4. Coffee Binge
  5. Supersonic
  6. Reading Between the Lines
  7. Distance Between
  8. Cleanse
  9. In Overdrive

Below are the photos of individual pieces and I also show you how they might look in a room.

The edges of the pieces are gallery wrapped, as shown below.

Gallery wrapped edges

I hope you’ve enjoyed my most recent collection. I am looking forward to creating many more, and growing as an artist with each new collection.

If you’d like to see my future collections a week or more before everyone else, sign up for my mailing list on my website at loririveraart.com. Subscribers on my mailing list receive perks, such as being included in a monthly drawing for a miniature painting giveaway, seeing my new work before the general public, and access to exclusive promotions.

And lastly, you can also follow me on Facebook and Instagram.

Uncategorized

Canvas or Hardboard Panels, and Size?

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Day two of painting faces. I think I may start a series of fun female portraits like the ones on this page and I just hope I can stick with it and keep the series going. I painted these two today and they were so much fun. I tend to jump around a lot with my painting and I’m hoping to change that with my fun portraits. I want to be known for a style/subject matter. I know that is not a priority for everyone, but for me it is.

Right now I’m trying to decide if I want to keep the facial features somewhat consistent or vary them. I’m leaning towards varying the shapes of the eyes, nose, and mouth because I’m afraid all of my paintings will look a little too similar if I keep things consistent. Even today, though I have a different eye color, eyebrows, etc., they look a lot alike because I used same eye and mouth shape.

But the biggest dilemma right now is trying to decide what substrate to use for these paintings. I like both canvas and hardboard panels, although between the two I like the hardboard panels a bit better. The advantage of using canvas is that you don’t have to frame the finished piece. You can just add a wire to the back and hang as is. But I don’t want to leave the sides unpainted, and for some reason when I paint with oil, I hate painting the edges. The hardboard panels must be either framed when completed, or sit on a tabletop easel. However, since 9x13s are a standard frame size, they can be easily popped into a standard frame with the glass removed.

I’m also trying to decide what size to paint. I’ve been painting on 9×13 panels and that seems to be a good size. Not too small, but not so large that the price is high. At this size, they are affordable for a wide audience.

I am still deciding, but at this point I am leaning towards the hardboard panels. I like the fact that they are sturdy and easy to store. I also like the way the oil paint glides on the panels. Canvas can get holes poked through it so easily, and dented too. Sometimes I also don’t like being able to see the tooth of the canvas. I probably need to buy a bunch of panels from Blick Art again.

I used to paint just on canvas. Little did I know that branching out to other substrates would be such a dilemma. So many choices!

My question to my readers is what size painting do you typically buy? Also, do you have difficult choices to make in your chosen career?

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