About Lori, abstract art

Welcome, new followers

Periodically I write a post like this one to welcome new followers and introduce myself again. I started painting in 2009, but didn’t start painting seriously until around 2018. I live in Evansville, Indiana with my husband, Mike, our 9-year old daughter, Autumn, and our two cats, Vincent Van Gogh and Mr. Wallace. When I first began painting, I was self-taught and painted things like flowers, trees, and abstracts on occasion. Then I went back to work in 2012 and being surrounded by artists on an almost daily basis reawakened my interest in becoming a full-time artist. In 2018, I left the regular 8-5 work world.

I took still life painting classes last year and learned techniques I now apply to my abstracts. Nowadays, I have decided to narrow my focus solely to abstract work, and growing as an abstract artist. I paint for many reasons, including to improve my mental health and to satisfy my primal need as a human being to create.

Twenty random facts (updated) about my art-making:

  1. My studio is in a room in our house, which means that it’s extremely convenient, but I also get sidetracked sometimes. It’s small but works for now.
  2. I find abstract art to be the most challenging genre. Creating something from nothing and out of your head that also looks nice compositionally is challenging.
  3. I’ve been painting since 2009, but painting on a more serious and dedicated level for the past year.
  4. I made it into my first juried exhibit last year.
  5. My favorite color is turquoise.
  6. I was around 90% self taught until last year when I took a few still life classes.
  7. I tone my canvas with burnt sienna and gray 95% of the time.
  8. When I create abstract art, my process is influenced heavily by the abstract expressionist movement.
  9. I dread cleaning my brushes after I paint. It’s probably what I dislike the most about the painting process.
  10. My favorite surface to work on is canvas when I paint with acrylic.
  11. I have a degree in business, not art, but if I could do college over, I would major in art. With that being said, my business degree has also been invaluable to my art career.
  12. I paint intuitively with no predetermined plan.
  13. I am homeschooling my daughter this year, so I mostly paint in the evenings and on weekends.
  14. I listen to all kinds of music when I paint but my favorites are Enya and 80s music.
  15. I’m a late bloomer. I didn’t start painting until I was 34, eleven years ago.
  16. I always have something to drink when I paint…coffee, tea, soda.
  17. I believe even the most masterful artists need to continue learning. Painting is a never ending journey.
  18. I hope to start plein air painting more with my artist friends.
  19. I stand up when painting abstracts. My whole body gets a little workout when I paint abstracts. That’s when I can get the most energy into a piece.
  20. My studio is usually messy!

So now it’s your turn. I’d love to know more about you. 🙂

abstract art, art classes

Abstract Art Lessons

Have you ever wanted to learn how to create abstract paintings fueled by emotions and driven by intuition? You feel a sense of freedom when painting abstracts and are able to unleash your emotions onto the canvas. I truly believe painting is a great mental health self-care tool. It’s something I have used for ten years to help me stay well.

Additionally, painting can help boost your self esteem and give you a sense of purpose. It’s something I have to look forward to, and I want to share this with you.

I just love the act of creation itself — the process of painting. I use intuition in combination with basic art principles to create my abstract works. In the beginning and middle of painting my piece, I let my intuition guide everything. Then towards the end of the painting, I refine the composition, adjust colors, and anything else that needs to be done. And I can’t wait to show you my process.

At this point I’m planning to include 4-5 videos in this first class. The videos will include a step-by step demonstration of me painting a piece from start to finish.

Want notifications on when the class is available? Sign up for my mailing list at loririveraart.com.

Books

Jumpstart Your Art: How to Begin Selling Your Artwork and Other Tidbits

I am excited that I just finished publishing my second book. My first book was a hands-on exercises kind of book, and the one I just published is an art marketing type of book. I think “Jumpstart Your Art” is the perfect sequel to my first book, “Paint Naturally: Internally Focused Abstract Art Workshop.”

“Jumpstart Your Art” discusses everything you need to know and have in place before you start selling your artwork. In this book, I cover nine P’s of marketing, including product, price, place, promotion, process, positioning, people, packaging, and physical evidence. Also included are artist interviews, artist tips and resources, a few painting exercises, and tips on how to make your art “yours.”

View Jumpstart Your Art on Amazon.

If you purchase my book, I would be ever so grateful if you’d review it on Amazon.

And don’t forget to follow me on Facebook and Instagram.

facebook.com/loririvera.art

instagram.com/loririvera.art

Art-o-mat®

Art Vending Machines

About a year ago, I stumbled upon the neatest thing in art that I’ve seen in years. Art-o-mat® takes retired cigarette vending machines and turns them into art vending machines. The Art-o-mat® machines hold art from many artists and I believe there are 400 artists from 10 different countries represented, as of July 7th, 2020. I purchased a prototype kit last year and after it was approved, I ordered my blocks and began working on the paintings at the end of last year. You can see my block floral series below.

I had an appendectomy for a ruptured appendix at the end of last year and a subsequent infection, which landed me in the hospital again a month later. All of this slowed me down quite a bit. But, FINALLY, I got all 50 of them finished and mailed from FedEx on Monday, and they are scheduled to arrive in North Carolina tomorrow, on the 8th of July, 2020.

These blocks were so much fun to create. At first it was a bit awkward because I usually don’t work so small. But once I got used to painting on that size block, things went faster. I also started working smarter as I neared the end of the batch as I began an assembly line method of painting. However, I did make each one unique; no two are alike. I wanted all of my pieces to look like they belong together and were made by the same artist, yet I strove for uniqueness as well. I am very pleased with how all of them turned out and I really hope some of the collectors who purchase them get in touch with me, simply to let me know they have one of my pieces.

I think this method of selling artwork is ideal for new and emerging artists, but also good for established artists. It’s a great way to get the word out about your art in other states, or even internationally, as there are several machines in other countries, too.

I can’t wait to see where they place my Art-o-mat® blocks!

Visit artomat.org for additional information.

abstract art, collection

New Collection Available: Overload

NEW COLLECTION! I am pleased to share the paintings in my new collection titled, Overload, that I began during the quarantine and just finished last week! Each of these is 24″x24″ (2 feet x 2 feet) and has gallery wrapped edges (composition extended to the sides).

This series was a blast to create as I explored a rainbow inspired shape in all of them, which was the only intentional aspect of the series. Other than incorporating the shape across all the pieces, I painted intuitively without a predetermined plan and painted from my emotions.

They are sold unframed, but since the sides are painted and they are wired on the back, they are ready to hang.

Each piece’s title was chosen based on life during a pandemic, how I was feeling at the time of the painting, or on my activities during the quarantine.

I plan to start my next series in about a month or so, but while I’m waiting to begin, I will be planning it out — deciding on the characteristic(s) that will tie the pieces together — whether it’s color, shape, texture, composition, or another unifying aspect. At this point I am leaning toward texture because I’d like to work on incorporating more texture into my pieces.

I hope you like seeing my work in collections rather than individually as I am moving away from creating individual standalone pieces, and moving towards working in series most all of the time. Even though each piece will be a part of a collection, they will still be sold individually, if desired. DM if you are interested in a piece or you can purchase on my website at loririveraart.com. It will definitely be difficult parting with these as I love how they all look together.

From left to right, top to bottom:

  1. Mortality
  2. Jitterbug
  3. After Midnight
  4. Coffee Binge
  5. Supersonic
  6. Reading Between the Lines
  7. Distance Between
  8. Cleanse
  9. In Overdrive

Below are the photos of individual pieces and I also show you how they might look in a room.

The edges of the pieces are gallery wrapped, as shown below.

Gallery wrapped edges

I hope you’ve enjoyed my most recent collection. I am looking forward to creating many more, and growing as an artist with each new collection.

If you’d like to see my future collections a week or more before everyone else, sign up for my mailing list on my website at loririveraart.com. Subscribers on my mailing list receive perks, such as being included in a monthly drawing for a miniature painting giveaway, seeing my new work before the general public, and access to exclusive promotions.

And lastly, you can also follow me on Facebook and Instagram.

Monthly Painting

Monthly Painting for Fans & Collectors

What will be painted on here? It’s a surprise! 😉

Starting in May, I will be giving away a 3″x3″ original painting with a little easel. I’ll draw from subscribers on my email list. So if you aren’t on my list yet, you can sign up here: https://bit.ly/loririveralist. I’ve painted beverages, flowers, and abstracts this month, in which some of them would transfer to a 3″x3″ canvas with a little easel quite well. I’m not sure yet what I will paint on this canvas so it will be a surprise!

On the last day of each month, I’ll be drawing from my mailing list one person to receive this giveaway. I will be announcing the winner in an email at the end of each month. You must open the email to find out if you’ve won, and you must respond within 48 hours.

This little canvas above will be full of life with a painting on it by May 31st, and just waiting to brighten your day! Do you have friends who might be interested in this? Please share this post with them, and thank you for your help in growing my email list! ☺️

Want to see what I’ve been up to this April? Here you go…

portraits

Self Portrait Creativity Challenge

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By nature, I am more of an abstract painter, one who relies on intuition rather than being influenced by the world around me. However, last year I took a few still life painting and figure drawing classes with the very talented Holly Storlie at Gamut Gallery. I just felt like I needed that extra boost, and I don’t think I could have executed this painting last night without Holly’s guidance from last year in class.

The Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana promoted a Self Portrait Creativity Challenge this week and I painted mine late last night. I spent more time on this portrait than any other one I’ve ever painted. To get better at portraits, I plan to paint a self portrait every month for the rest of this year. I may also paint portraits of others in addition to my monthly self portrait.

Really the only part of this painting I’m not happy with is my nose. It appears flat and I’m sure I can fix it with more shadows and highlights. I reworked it a couple times already and I’m still not happy with it so I think I’m going to grab a canvas panel tonight and paint my nose however many times it takes to get it right. Then I’ll copy the same technique of the best one onto my self portrait.

I would love to hear from others who paint portraits and how you gained some mastery in creating them. For me it’s practice, practice, practice from here on out!

Cheers!

P.S. And maybe I should change the title of this one from “Self Portrait 2020-2” to “I Hate Painting Noses.” 🤣

Artist Tips

Failing Beautifully

I have approximately 200 finished paintings in our home and my studio, and this number does not include the 200-300 I’ve painted over or sent to the trash because I wasn’t happy with them. Very rarely do I paint over a painting I don’t like anymore, and that’s because I’ve improved over time. I also plan to hang on to most of these paintings because many aren’t representative of my current work. But what does all of this really mean?

I was talking to a friend today who started painting a few years ago and she said that she wasn’t confident enough to put her art out there yet. I assured her that it would come in time and that in the beginning, for every 100 paintings I created, only about 5-10 were good. Maybe not even good, maybe more like just decent. I’ve been painting since 2009, but for the first seven years, I was painting very rarely because I was working and at home raising our daughter. I figure since 2009 I’ve averaged at least seven hours of painting time each week, and that number is underestimated I’m sure.

My point is that that equals over 3,500 hours and without all that practice and all of the failures, I wouldn’t be where I am today. For every failure, I have found yet one more way not to do something. I see failure as a measurement of effort; If I never fail, that means I am not experimenting and stretching myself to the limits. I truly believe you aren’t growing if you’re not failing at times, too.

I don’t like it when people ask me how long it took me to paint something, because really, the true answer is that it took me 3,500+ hours to create it! In art, all of your experience — all of the cumulative failures and successes — are what allow you to create what you create today.

Even though I’m a better painter now than 10 years ago, I do still produce bad paintings sometimes, and as weird as it may sound, I’m proud of them because it means I am pushing myself, as not every new technique I try is going to work out – as is the case with my “NOPE” painting above!

So practice as much as you can, fail beautifully, and revel in your eventual successes. If you fail enough, you will succeed!

Follow me on Instagram and Facebook @loririvera.art

Artist Interviews

Interview with Painter, Jaime Haney

My friend and fellow artist, Jaime Haney, and I thought it would be fun to interview each other about our journey in art making. I love Jaime’s beautiful and colorful paintings; She’s always creating something new and exciting and I can’t wait to see what she does next. I am thrilled to offer you the interview below. You can read my interview on her blog here.

Jaime-Haney-sitting-in-her-art-studio-August-20141
Jaime surrounded by her gorgeous paintings

When did you realize you wanted to be a painter?

I’ve been an artist all my life and I don’t really remember a time when I wasn’t one. It truly is how I’ve identified myself all of my life. I was always encouraged by my parents to create and express myself from the beginning. My mother was always creative and my father made his living as an artist. When I was a teen, I preferred to illustrate mostly. I experimented in photography for a short time. It seemed like common knowledge that fine art wasn’t a profitable avenue to take so I went into graphic design. While it was a creative outlet, I still would draw and create things in my off hours. A few years after the birth of my son, about 2011, I felt the urge to pick up the paintbrush and I’ve been painting ever since. It’s been very rewarding and frustrating at the same time.

Where do you find inspiration for your paintings?

Oh my, where don’t I find inspiration?! Seriously, inspiration comes to me in so many forms. It comes in dreams, A lot of times I am painting in my dreams. It comes from my day dreams and even while I drive or shower. It comes from my many lush gardens I tend – the shadows of a clump of plants, the brilliant colored flower petals. Inspiration comes from the natural world around me, like the woods behind my house where I like to walk, explore… and get inspired. Watching TV, I may get inspired by a face or a place – many times I’ve paused the program and snapped a photo because I was inspired by the look on a face or slight smile or curve of a neck. The way a woman’s eyes look away with melancholy. Music deeply inspires me and has been the source of many paintings including titles for paintings. Writings and poems inspire me. There really isn’t a time I’m not inspired. I am constantly painting in my mind… how would that song look if I were to paint it? I’m never at a loss for inspiration – it is literally everywhere.

Mystical-Mother-Nature-painting-by-Jaime-Haney_lores“Mystical Mother Nature” by Jaime Haney

How do you describe your style?

I’ve had my work described as Fauvism – I’m sure because of the strong color I use. But I would describe my style as more Post Impressionistic. While my paintings are somewhat realistic in their stylings, I’m not concerned with photo realism. I prefer there to be acknowledgment that my hand made the art, imperfections and all. I hope to evoke to the viewer the feeling I’m experiencing from my subjects whether they’re made up in my imagination or from real life. There’s a certain darkness to my work, whether that’s seen or just felt. I’m not really a light and airy type of painter, I love to inject a little mystique to my work… a nod to the supernatural even.

Who influences you?

I can’t really say that I’m influenced by any certain artist as I’m not well versed in art history. However, I am familiar with past artists like Frida Khalo, Henri Rousseau, Leonora Carrington, Georgia O’Keeffe, Dorothea Tanning and Gustav Klimt. I like their paintings very much and might go as far as to say their work influences me but maybe it’s just because we like similar subjects or colors, I don’t know. Perhaps it’s easier to see as a viewer of my art rather than myself who influences my work.

Peacock-Feathers-Painting-Night-Flight-on-easel-by-Jaime-Haney-

Do you take commissions?

I do occasionally take commissions if the fit is right. The person wanting the work would of course need to enjoy my style and not ask for me to paint in a way that isn’t natural for me.

Tell me about your commission process.

For this I’m going to lead you to a web page on my site and it talks about going through a commission. https://jaimehaney.com/ever-wanted-commission-painting/

What do you find to be the most difficult step of painting a piece?

I’d have to say that would be different for each painting. However, I also will say when I start a new painting it’s almost like I’ve forgotten everything I’ve ever learned and I go through the process thinking to myself well how am I going to do that? I just have to start, many times with a rough sketch, and the painting moves on from various stages often without my knowledge of what I’ve even done. My painting process seems to incur many stages of my being lost somewhere in my mind and I love this. While on the other hand some paintings have many stages that are just awful looking and I have to reconsider what I’m doing but usually if I keep at it, I can pull it out of that dreadful stage. That is when many paintings go to rest on a ledge somewhere while I let time and sometimes dreams tell me what to do about them. The best paintings to me though are the ones that somehow appear without my realization of how they got there, it’s that wonderful land of being in the zone… as if it paints itself and I’m just the channel.

What is your favorite thing about being an artist?

Oh, so many things. I love being able to take my viewer to another world and forget their problems or just everyday goings on. Also painting or drawing what I imagine or dream, reality means nothing when I’m creating and I find that very seductive. Being able to convey a feeling or mood with the strokes of my brush. When I walk into my studio and know that no matter what I decide to paint that day I alone have control of my painted reality and that is very satisfying.

How do you know when a painting is finished?

This is a difficult question and each painting is different. Like I mentioned, my dad is an artist and we’re very close. I often ask his opinion on a painting to see if he feels it needs anything more. Many times I set aside a painting to let it simmer in my thoughts without having to make a snap decision. When I go back to it with fresh eyes, possibly something jumps out to me and I know where to go from there or decide it is finished as it can be so I sign it and it’s done. Other times I just know it’s done. Some paintings are simply abandoned and I move onto another because I’m sick of it.

How do you title your paintings?

I love to title paintings. Sometimes the name will come to me as I paint it and I’ll write it down in my studio so I don’t forget. Occasionally a song playing (or the lyrics) while I’m painting will become the title or lead to the title. My titles tend to be dramatic and deep, evoking what I’m feeling during the process of painting it. Sometimes though they simply are just what the painting is of, but more often than not I like a deeper meaning to the title.

Nearly-finished-pond-mermaid-painting
“What  Lies Beneath” by Jaime Haney

What is your work day like?

I’ll start out by saying I’m naturally a night owl but with having a son in school, that has curbed my night owl ways. I’ve always felt more creative at night but I’ve learned that as a professional artist I cannot wait on a feeling and must create my own inspiration during the hours I have available. So my work day starts when I return home from dropping my son off to school and I usually start with my computer. I check and return emails or communication with my email list. Next, I check to make sure my website is up and running and deal with that if needed. Then answer any comments I have on my blog, perhaps write a new post and eventually make my way to social media which is a very important part of my art business. Around 11:30 I eat something and then head to the art studio. I get about three and a half hours of painting in and then it’s time for my son to come home on the school bus. After this, the day just flies by. I spend some time chatting with him about his day and according to whether he wants my company or if he wants to play video games, I might get another hour in the studio before it’s time to close it up and get dinner started. After dinner, I might get back on social media for a short time to reply to comments or post more and that’s about it for my evening.

Artist-worktable
A peek inside Jaime Haney’s studio

What are your favorite subjects to paint?

There are a wide variety of subjects I like to paint. I’m an avid gardener so I enjoy painting tropical plants, gardens and flowers. But there is a bigger part of me that would rather paint abstract landscapes, making up my own world I see in my dreams and visions. Trees are always a favorite but more than anything I really like to add a sense of mystery to my paintings no matter what the subject is. Life is never boring and there are endless subjects to paint that give me pleasure. There’s usually a story associated with my painting either a true one, folklore and myth or something I’ve just made up. That’s the greatest thing about being an artist, you can make anything you want and I find my imagination is the best at creating subjects to paint.

How can people find and buy your art?

My website is http://jaimehaney.com and that is where I have an online store where my art can be purchased and I ship it out. I also host my blog on there, it’s really the best place to find me. I have a monthly email that I send out to subscribers where I offer my new paintings, art show invites and other fun things, come sign up I’d love to have you. I do have a Facebook page for my art as well as an Instagram and I’ll share them below, but since we have so little control over these social avenues and they could be pulled out from under us at any time, I’d rather have someone contact me directly via email jaime@jaimehaney.com or through my website.

My Facebook page: www.facebook.com/JaimeHaneyArtist

My Instagram handle: Jaime Haney  https://www.instagram.com/jaimehaney/

About Lori

20 Random Art Facts

It’s been a week or two since I’ve written a blog post. I’ve been painting pretty consistently and below are my last two paintings. I know…I know…a little early for Christmas themed paintings, but I’m trying to get a head start.

IMG_1465

I thought I’d write “20 Random Art Facts About Me” so you can get to know me better as a painter.

IMG_1472
Painting in my studio

  1. My studio is in a room in our house, which means that it’s extremely convenient, but I also get sidetracked sometimes. It’s small but works for now.
  2. I find abstract art to be the most challenging genre to master. Creating something from nothing and out of your head takes special skill.
  3. I’ve been painting since 2009, but painting on a more serious and dedicated level for the past year.
  4. I made it into my first juried exhibit this year.
  5. My favorite color is turquoise.
  6. I was around 90% self taught until this year when I took a few still life classes.
  7. I tone my canvas with Burnt Sienna 95% of the time.
  8. When I create abstract art, my process is influenced heavily by the abstract expressionist movement. I’m not really sure what/who influences my still life yet.
  9. I dread cleaning my brushes after I paint. It’s probably what I dislike the most about the painting process.
  10. My favorite surface to work on is hardboard panels.
  11. I have a degree in business, not art, but if I could do college over, I would major in art.
  12. My current favorite subjects to paint is different kinds of fruit and vegetables.
  13. I try to get started painting by 10:00 a.m. on days that I paint.
  14. I listen to all kinds of music when I paint but my favorites are Enya and 80s music.
  15. I’m a late bloomer. I didn’t start painting until I was 34, ten years ago.
  16. I always have something to drink when I paint…coffee, tea, soda.
  17. I believe even the most masterful artists need to continue learning. Painting is a never ending journey.
  18. I hope to start plein air painting next spring.
  19. I sit down when I paint still life but stand up when painting abstracts. My whole body gets a little workout when I paint abstracts. That’s when I can get the most energy into a piece.
  20. My studio is usually messy!

I would love to get to know you too. Feel free to leave a comment with random things about you.

Lori